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FORUMS > Training and Behavior < refresh >
Topic Title: How to get my dog to stop eating my Shoes!!!
Created On Wed October 18, 2006 11:10 AM
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Peaches
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Wed October 18, 2006 11:10 AM
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Hello All,
I have a 2 year old Red nose Pit Pull who eats our shoes every time we leave the house. Does anyone have any tips on how to get her to stop. She gets ran everyday and plenty of toys and bones to chew on. Its usually when we leave for work, she has free run of the house and our yard. My husband has started to hit her on the butt with the shoes but he really hate to do it plus she still wags her tail like its a game. We really don't want to lock her out side all day while were gone but we don't really know what else to do. We have tried the Sour sprays but those don't work for her.

Any info appreciated.
Thanks,
Brittany
 
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Shiplesp
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Wed October 18, 2006 11:36 AM
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Any reason you can't put your shoes away?

Susan
 
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Ollie and Augie
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Wed October 18, 2006 11:50 AM
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Unless you catch her actually chewing on the shoe, or grabbing one, correcting her won't help. She won't associate the correction with her behavior. And if she's going for them while you're gone, you can't very well catch her in the act.

Put your shoes in a closet, or an armoire, or in a room she can't access during the day. Our first dog had a shoe fetish, too. She outgrew it eventually, but for the first few years our shoes had to either be on our feet or in a latched armoire.



-------------------------
aka "Beth"

- but I AM a Dr. Vickery fan

"Some people just need to be bitten"
-MMC, CPDT
 
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espencer85
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Wed October 18, 2006 12:14 PM
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How often you excersice your dog? the dogs need at least 1 hour a day, if not then they will have energy accumulated and chewing shoes is a way to release that energy or even frustration for lack of excercise, and exercise does not mean just be by herself in the back yard, burn that extra energy and your dog will just stay calm the rest of the day
 
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colliemom
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Thu October 19, 2006 9:56 AM
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Put your shoes in the closet. Don't hit the dog. Ever. Especially hours after chewing. There is no learning possible here except perhaps: "When they come back after leaving they hit me with their shoes. Maybe I didn't chew them properly." Sounds funny. But that is more likely to be learned than,"Oh, they hit me so that means I shouldn't chew their shoes." In fact, hitting the dog on your return home will only increase the dog's anxiety about you leaving the home and then is likely to drive the dog to chew more. SO STOP HITTING YOUR DOG.

Pits are stubborn and often devoted to their people beyond all reason. Your shoes are the second-most smelly piece of body covering you can leave around. They are delicious reminders of you. By chewing shoes, your dog is becoming one with you and worshipping you as the god you are. Gods such as yourselves are too important and wonderful to ever, ever, ever hit a dog. Especially one that loves you soooo much.

The dog may learn to open the closet to get to these important icons of devotion. So keep the shoes in a cupboard up off the floor as our ancestors used to do to keep the mice out of them.

Meanwhile, your dog wants to chew something that is you in abiding hero worship of you. So, when you get a new chewie bone or rawhide, keep it in the dirty laundry or your shoes! for a few hours. Then give that toy/chewie to your dog only when you leave the house. Yahoo, you have provided the proper object of worship! "Ah, the foot coverings are no longer important, it is this bone!"

Regardless of bones and other chew objects scattered around the house, THIS is the SPECIAL BONE. Give it when you leave. Pick it up when you return.
 
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colliemom
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Thu October 19, 2006 10:06 AM
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Oh, and that wagging the tail as if it is a game? 1) Pits have been bred to have "thick skin" and fewer pain sensors so they can fight longer. 2) A wagging tail in a situation in which alleged "discipline" is being administered is NOT the dog thinking it is a game. It is a sign of submission. A general sign, unspecific to the shoes. In dog talk, the dog is saying, "Why are you hitting me! Please stop, I'll be good!" If the dog follows up with a "play bow" it is another attempt, just as some children will do, to please someone who is hurting them. If it doesn't physically hurt it still startles the dog and frightens it.

Why, oh why, would you ever, ever, want your dog to be afraid of you? And, word of warning. A frightened dog is far more likely to "turn on" its persons. So, your instincts are correct. If you "don't like" hitting your dog, STOP.
 
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jaydenandmaggiesmom
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Thu October 19, 2006 10:07 AM
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I also don't believe that a tail wagging always means happiness. She could very well be acknowledging the hitting with the shoe with a tail wag. She certainly is receiving the feedback from the hitting and communicating with her tail.

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Stef
 
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Thandi
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Thu October 19, 2006 10:34 AM
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I think colliemom is absolutely right about the shoe being your smell. Chloe has toys and chews all over the house, which Mika always uses, but Chloe will try and find something of ours: pyjamas, a book I was reading next to the bed, socks, underwear, and best of all, the backs of shoes where they are soft. So, we keep everything out of her reach. Mistakes do happen and occasionally she still gets something of ours, but for the most part we have just learned that she is and probably always will be a rather insecure child and needs the connection to her family when we aren't there.

I always know when she's done something wrong--she just gives me that look when I walk thru the door at the end of the day. I don't even yell or scold, and never hit. It was my own fault for leaving stuff where she could get it.
 
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