Links open in new window.

THE TOOLBOX FOR BUILDING A GREAT FAMILY DOG
by Terry Ryan

DO OVER DOGS - GIVE YOUR DOG A SECOND CHANCE FOR A FIRST CLASS LIFE
by Pat Miller

FOCUSED PUPPY
by Deb Jones and Judy Keller

MINDING YOUR DOG BUSINESS - A PRACTICAL GUIDE TO BUSINESS SUCCESS FOR DOG PROFESSIONALS
by Veronica Boutelle and Rikke Jorgensen

UNLOCKING THE CANINE ANCESTRAL DIET - HEALTHIER DOG FOOD THE ABC WAY
by Steve Brown

DOMINANCE THEORY AND DOGS, 2ND EDITION
by James O'Heare

CAUTIOUS CANINE - HOW TO HELP DOGS CONQUER THEIR FEARS, 2ND EDITION
by Patricia McConnell

KIDS AND DOGS - A PROFESSIONAL'S GUIDE TO HELPING FAMILIES
by Colleen Pelar




Navigation:


FORUMS > Training and Behavior < refresh >
Topic Title: Leadership exercises to do with dog
Created On Wed May 16, 2007 5:45 PM
Topic View:

View thread in raw text format


ernie00
Member

Posts: 7
Joined: May 2007

Wed May 16, 2007 5:45 PM
User is offline

I'm looking for good and effective exercises that I can do with my dog to establish my leadership.

Thanks

Ernie
 
Reply
   
Quote
   
Top
   
Bottom
     



RottieWoman
Senior Member

Posts: 4596
Joined: Nov 2006

Thu May 17, 2007 6:44 AM
User is offline View users profile

Hi, ernie00!

I don't know what you mean exactly by "leadership" - do you mean things like, "going out of doorways first" or do you mean "doggie parents are benevolent leaders and the source of all GOOD STUFF"? In my opinion, leadership has little or nothing to do with the former (doorways) and everything to do with the latter (benevolence). Providing leadership means instilling confidence in your dog by teaching him what is the RIGHT thing to do, not focusing on what was the WRONG thing. Benevolent leaders are calm, predictable and provide lots of opportunities for fun and success. So, you can teach you dog all kinds of fun things, like shaking hands, opening and closing doors, agility games, the obedience work, etc - teach them all kinds of behaviors you want and that you like - the more things they have to do and can practice with you, the less they are practicing the behaviors you DON'T want. Every time you have you dog sit at the door before you let her out (regardless of whether you or the dog goes out first if you DO both go out), or you capture a neat behavior that you can later work on together to get some desired action on her part (like, say she happens to raise her a bit while she is sitting - you can mark that and use it as an exercise that she can later do for you before you play her favorite tug game, or when you are out for a walk and you see that she may start to get a bit anxious or distracted by another dog down the block, then you can use that same paw behavior (which by this time has become "shaking hands" ) to distract her from whatever is interesting of of concern to her - when you do those kinds of things, then you show leadership.

-------------------------
Rottie Mommy in WI - USA
 
Reply
   
Quote
   
Top
   
Bottom
     



RottieWoman
Senior Member

Posts: 4596
Joined: Nov 2006

Thu May 17, 2007 6:46 AM
User is offline View users profile

....."happens to raise.... " = "happens to raise her PAW" :-)

-------------------------
Rottie Mommy in WI - USA
 
Reply
   
Quote
   
Top
   
Bottom
     



AllGoodDogs
Senior Member

Posts: 765
Joined: Apr 2007

Thu May 17, 2007 7:19 AM
User is offline

Being consistent with whatever manners and tricks you teach and being calm helps a lot.

I like the question...What do you want the dog to do instead?
 
Reply
   
Quote
   
Top
   
Bottom
     



ernie00
Member

Posts: 7
Joined: May 2007

Thu May 17, 2007 5:49 PM
User is offline

That is what I meant by leadership. Exercises that will build trust and confidence with the puppy.
 
Reply
   
Quote
   
Top
   
Bottom
     



RottieWoman
Senior Member

Posts: 4596
Joined: Nov 2006

Fri May 18, 2007 6:25 AM
User is offline View users profile

Tricks, interactive games, skills like retrieving objects on the floor beyond doggie toys, all kinds of things build trust and confidence as long as the puppy sees you as predictable and benevolent -


:-)

-------------------------
Rottie Mommy in WI - USA
 
Reply
   
Quote
   
Top
   
Bottom
     



AllGoodDogs
Senior Member

Posts: 765
Joined: Apr 2007

Fri May 18, 2007 9:16 AM
User is offline

I think what we are saying is anything you practice within the positive training (clicker training) guidelines will create a trusting relationship.

If you are inconsistent or create fear that would break down the relationship.

For example today I am going to pet sit 3 times at a house where I am training the puppy. When I go there even though it is not a training day she will sit before I open the door and we will play together with sit down and down stay etc. and recall.

Edited: Fri May 18, 2007 at 9:29 AM by AllGoodDogs
 
Reply
   
Quote
   
Top
   
Bottom
     



colliemom
Senior Member

Posts: 1141
Joined: Mar 2006

Sun May 20, 2007 11:21 AM
User is offline

Most "training" is all about teaching good manners. And, good manners are manners which happen everywhere. One fun thing I learned from a trainer is to have a nice blankie wherever I go with my puppy. This really worked with Oliver, who, as regular readers of this forum know, is my high-wire act. The blankie goes by your place when you sit and read or watch t.v. The blankie goes with you when you visit and take your baby. The blankie goes to doggy class, out in the yard, in the car. The blankie (and it may be a towel or even an old shirt of yours) is laid out, along with a little water (get a portable water container) and a toy. Blankie should be about 2'-3' square. Blankie should be soft and comfy, because blankie is also an impromptu doggie sleep spot. Meanwhile, with a "D" clip, keep puppy clipped to your belt. Never punish the puppy by "sending" him to the blankie. Rather, teach the puppy with happy talk and quiet play and an ever present chewie that staying by you, on the blankie, is a very fun and good thing to do. Puppy can be trained on the blankie, with my favourite puppy trainer trick -- "Puppy pushups" -- so puppy learns to associate sit, stand, down with the blankie home base. If puppy wanders off, the leash will get your attention -- it's not meant to be a jerk back or tug of war spot, that blankie, and you can re-encourage puppy to come back to the blankie with chewie, or toy, or maybe even a tidbit treat.

After awhile, puppy will continue to choose to be right there with you regardless of the extra accoutrements -- but don't rush it. Blankie may help with all sorts of things. Oliver loved his blankie so much, it even helped with leash training. When I carried it, he associated that with the invisible "three foot cube" in which one wants a pup to stay when walking on a loose lead.

That -- and "Look at me" as it sounds, this training basic is useful as a starting point for all things. Teeny tidbit treat, let puppy sniff it, say "look at me" and draw treat to your cheek (no jumping up, puppy!) so the puppy looks at your eyes. When puppy looks at you, with those beautiful puppy eyes, "Good puppy!" and pop that treat tidbit in that little needlemouth. These are not whole treats as sold in stores. Barely a crumb, really, maybe half a Cheerio (reg. trademark). If you get your dog doing a good "look at me" early in life, then you will have a dog that is ready to learn things from you. So, the object of leadership for a pup is to get the dog to look to you, and to associate being near to you with fun, yet peaceful activity, including a soft nap spot. Always use a happy voice. Never expect a dog to respond to an dull voice or a voice that sounds more angry than not.
 
Reply
   
Quote
   
Top
   
Bottom
     



TheGlobeAndAnchor
Member

Posts: 20
Joined: Apr 2007

Sun June 03, 2007 7:45 PM
User is offline

Ernie-

Congradulations to you for going down this road with your puppy. You will find (I am certain) that as you discover the skills to better lead your dog, you will become a better leader within your family, and in your workplace. In the end, we are not so different after all.

Matt
 
Reply
   
Quote
   
Top
   
Bottom
     



schmoo
Senior Member

Posts: 904
Joined: Oct 2006

Mon June 04, 2007 4:45 PM
User is offline

Maybe I'm being too simplistic in my outlook, but IMHO "leadership exercises" is mainly controlling your dog's access to things he wants, getting him to understand and accept that getting what he wants is contingent upon first doing what you want.

Edited: Mon June 04, 2007 at 4:46 PM by schmoo
 
Reply
   
Quote
   
Top
   
Bottom
     



Sonnyboy
Member

Posts: 2
Joined: Jun 2007

Thu June 14, 2007 8:32 PM
User is offline

Do a search on Google for NILIF, or Nothing in Life is Free. Basically, it means that your dog has to do something (sit, down, or anything you want, such as tricks) to earn every single resource/reward/desirable thing in his life. Petting, snuggling on the sofa, food, toys, playing with other dogs, and going outside are things that your dogs has to work for. It's not as mean as it sounds! Dogs love it. Everything becomes a game. Your dog becomes motivated to learn and also learns to look to you for All Things Good.
 
Reply
   
Quote
   
Top
   
Bottom
     

View thread in raw text format
FORUMS > Training and Behavior < refresh >

Navigation: