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FORUMS > Health, Wellness and Nutrition < refresh >
Topic Title: is honey a problem for dogs
Created On Thu February 23, 2006 1:57 PM
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ebohatch
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Thu February 23, 2006 1:57 PM
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I have heard many times not to feed a dog chocolate because it may kill him, no idea if this is true but I don't. But what about honey, an all natural product. I use it often for myself. Great natural anti-biotic for the teeth and gums. Is there a problem for dogs other than they don't like sweet things.
 
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3acds
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Sat February 25, 2006 12:42 PM
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Chocolate has a chemical that affects the heart & can indeed kill a dog. Two other things I've seen listed are lima beans & onions. Dogs DO LKE sweet stuff, that's way so many die of anti-freeze poisoning. 3acds

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3acds
 
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healingdog
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Tue March 14, 2006 8:46 PM
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Honey is one of the oldest healing agents known to man.

It is high in copper, calcium, iron, potassium, magnesium, enzymes, protien, carbs and vitamin c. It is a strong anti bacterial, natural sedative, a laxative, immune bulider and energy enhancing predigested food.

Bee pollen, royal jelly honeycomb and propolis are more concentrated.

Bee pollen aids digestion and circulation and boosts the immune system. spped healing, reduces allergy symprtoms.

As a Naturopath and herbalist I do a lot of work with dogs and I often suggest royal jelly for dogs who have lost their appetite due to illness or their own transition process. It offers a tremendous amount of nutritional support as well as health and emotional support.

Christine Agro, Founder, Healing Dog and Speak, A Natural Voice For Dogs

Healing Dog Website
Speak, A Natural Voice For Dogs Website
 
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Ravette
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Fri March 24, 2006 12:50 AM
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Molasses (sp?) I don't think I spelt that right but its 11:49 after my last day of finals lmao so I am not worried about it heh! Molasses is another great product I use it to back dog treats but I find that my dogs like honey better.

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No bad dogs just bad owners.....
 
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colliemom
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Fri March 24, 2006 11:05 AM
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Raw honey and bee products? Cooked honey? How is it processed? What type of plant pollen and derivatives are in the honey or bee products? Remember that our four foot friends do not process taste the way that we do. Thus, the TASTE of honey is likely not a matter of preference. It might taste good to us, but it is still really people food.

Remember too, that sugars are sugars. While some are allegedly more digestible, or higher in some trace elements, whether it is fructose, glucose, or sucrose -- it is still sugar. We and our dogs are attracted to sugars for the quick energy. Energy is calories. Since most of us and our dogs are not hauling water and logs, moving tonnes of dirt, turning a meat spit in a restaurant or home kitchen, hauling carts or herding (except for part-time fun) and most often our dogs and ourselves do not require the same amount of calories whether those calories are found in sugar, or carboydrates (which turn to "sugar"), proteins, or vegetable matter. Why give your dog unnecessary sugar? And, if it is raw honey or other bee products, why introduce potential allergens to the system? Babies should avoid honey until their immune systems develop. People may develop a reaction to bee products at any time in their lives, due to the nature of some raw bee products which may concentrate allergens in pollens. (Just ask all the dancers and athletes who suddenly break out in hives -- no pun intended -- from consuming bee products based on health claims.) Cooked honey? Whatever marginal benefits other than a lovely taste are pasteurized right out.

Molasses, which is concentrated, cooked sugar cane, (basically, the scrapings from the bottom of the processing pot of sugar-making) is delicious, and has trace elements of iron, and also serves as a "spring tonic" for humans or dogs if they are constipated. It is a by-product from the sugar industry. Molasses was originally provided to slaves and draft animals as part of the diet and to keep them working while the more "refined" (literally and figuratively) sugar was marketed based on the DEGREE of WHITENESS, and the refinement of the grains. The whiter the sugar, the more expensive it was.

Animals were fed a mixture of leftover sugar cane fibers and molasses, and cheap, nasty dog food still might contain cane fiber. Molasses soon became a "health" food and was MARKETED as such, when people turned to gas-powered vehicles and the market for cane based feed dropped. It was a cheaper alternative to rationed white sugar during the wars, and women's cookbooks came up with a bazillion ways to convert sugar-based recipes to molasses-based recipes. A great pitch to mom was that molasses is (marginally) healthier. And, some manufacturers ADDED vitamins to their molasses mix. That doesn't mean we don't love molasses cookies and candies, but it is what it is, SUGAR. Just because it is "natural" or "raw" and gooey rather than grainy doesn't mean it is really much different that the white stuff from the top of the processing pot.

Yes, wild animals gorge on honey. They gorge on fermented fruit, too, but we don't generally feed our dogs and cats brandy or that other delicious high calorie sugar by-product -- rum.

Bears and wolves and foxes and mice and any furry, little or large, that can get their paws on the honey will gorge on it. They gorge on honey when the hives are full, usually right before hibernation season/winter starts. Fat and weight are essential to making it through the winter scarcities and cold and honey has many, many calories. Our four foots will get their kibble no matter what and live in temperature controlled circumstances, so there isn't a need for gorging on honey or adding say an extra 150 calories to a well-balanced, well thought out dog breakfast or supper by mixing in a dollop of honey.

So, the question to ask is why am I thinking that honey is good for my dog? Because I add it to my tea and cook with it and I think the dog will enjoy eating my food? No matter how you crack it, it is PEOPLE FOOD, and should be treated as people food. If it is used, its caloric value should be deducted from the diet mix. And it really isn't a subsitute for vitamins and trace elements in other, less caloric food.

 
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