Links open in new window.

THE TOOLBOX FOR BUILDING A GREAT FAMILY DOG
by Terry Ryan

DO OVER DOGS - GIVE YOUR DOG A SECOND CHANCE FOR A FIRST CLASS LIFE
by Pat Miller

FOCUSED PUPPY
by Deb Jones and Judy Keller

MINDING YOUR DOG BUSINESS - A PRACTICAL GUIDE TO BUSINESS SUCCESS FOR DOG PROFESSIONALS
by Veronica Boutelle and Rikke Jorgensen

UNLOCKING THE CANINE ANCESTRAL DIET - HEALTHIER DOG FOOD THE ABC WAY
by Steve Brown

DOMINANCE THEORY AND DOGS, 2ND EDITION
by James O'Heare

CAUTIOUS CANINE - HOW TO HELP DOGS CONQUER THEIR FEARS, 2ND EDITION
by Patricia McConnell

KIDS AND DOGS - A PROFESSIONAL'S GUIDE TO HELPING FAMILIES
by Colleen Pelar




Navigation:


FORUMS > Health, Wellness and Nutrition < refresh >
Topic Title: Help am I overreacting to my dogs swelling after spaying??
Created On Sat May 12, 2007 7:12 AM
Topic View:

View thread in raw text format


pinktat
Member

Posts: 9
Joined: Apr 2007

Sat May 12, 2007 7:12 AM
User is offline

My dog was spade 12 days ago and she has a swelling where she was opened. It looks like a tennis ball was insterted before they stiched her up. She also has a temprature, where the stiches were is normal, no redness or tenderness. I mentioned it on her 3 day check up and the vet said the swelling would go down and the temp was due to her going beserk while in the clinic. (she has behaviour problems). I then mentioned it when she had the stitched out 3 days ago. The nurse (we didn't see the vet) said if I was still bothered in a few days call back with her, she made me feel as if I was worrying about something thats normal. Well I have just been to our very good pet shop and they all said there was something wrong and I should take her back and insist they look at her and do something. The place is closed now for the weekend and my dog is fine in herself, playing and eating etc. Should I be charged for further treatment? Or should it be included in the spaying? I feel really guilty now and should have gone with my gut instinct that something wasn't right, but she is my first dog and they made me feel daft for worrying. She has never had an ill day in her life. Does anyone know what it could be and dispite her being well in herself should it be treated as urgent or can it wait until monday? Please help.
 
Reply
   
Quote
   
Top
   
Bottom
     



Pauline
Senior Member

Posts: 397
Joined: Aug 2006

Sat May 12, 2007 8:35 AM
User is offline

I don't know if it's serious or not, but I'd want a vet to take a look at her swelling. Maybe a DIFFERENT vet! I know it's more costly that way. My vet's clinic is open on Saturday. Maybe you can find one that is. I wish you and your dog the best.

-------------------------
Pauline

Don Sullivan for search
 
Reply
   
Quote
   
Top
   
Bottom
     



ladysnowfall
Senior Member

Posts: 508
Joined: Apr 2007

Sat May 12, 2007 9:04 AM
User is offline

I agree with Pauline. I've never heard of a dog getting a fever from going berserk. But, even if that were true, the temp would not last for days. Think of how babies get. They can scream and get warm, but shortly after they settle down, everything is back to normal. I think a second opinion not just from a different vet, but a different clinic is in order. Sometimes vets at the same clinic don't like to countermand something the other vet has already said. So, another clinic would be best.
 
Reply
   
Quote
   
Top
   
Bottom
     



colliemom
Senior Member

Posts: 1141
Joined: Mar 2006

Mon May 14, 2007 8:10 AM
User is offline

Well, there are internal stitches, as well as external stitches in a spay. Lots of opportunity for stitches to "pop" or an infection to emerge, especially if there was a bit of leaping and twisting during initial recovery. GET HER TO A VET. Let the vets talk to one another about the dog.
 
Reply
   
Quote
   
Top
   
Bottom
     



pinktat
Member

Posts: 9
Joined: Apr 2007

Wed May 16, 2007 5:03 AM
User is offline

I would like to thankyou all for your advice. I have returned her to the same vet and kicked up a stink so they are now listening to me. It is unfortunate that they didn't listen to me earlier as she is quite ill now. They don't know what is worng and have given her antibiotics. He asked me if she hadn't had the op and if we ignored the lump would I have brought her back, I said yes because besides the temprature I know my dog and I know somethings wrong.(he said, good you know your pet!) He says the swelling has gone down and it can be normal for it to swell like that, although I've not found any evidence of that anywhere. I'm still insistant that it is the op thats caused this and he won't accept or deny it. After a long chat I am looking after her at home, making sure she doesn't get to out of breath or overheat (her temp was just over 103) and cooking her fresh food. I know he is on the otherend of the phone but after everything I had to do to make him listen I do not have enough confidence to leave her in his care. So fingers crossed that this will pass quickly. Thankyou again for all your advice, it was enough for me to put my foot down and insist he looked at her. Being a newish dog owner you can get fobbed off as overprotective.
 
Reply
   
Quote
   
Top
   
Bottom
     



colliemom
Senior Member

Posts: 1141
Joined: Mar 2006

Wed May 16, 2007 7:36 AM
User is offline

Most spay and neuters go without incident. The key here for me is that your doggy jumped around during the recovery period. It is generally longer and harder for a bitch to recover than her brother -- it's the internals, eh?

Vets are very cautious about liability after surgery, especially if it is on a dog they haven't "met" or know well and on a new doggy person. There are some "family vets" that now refuse to do any surgery at all. It is unfortunate, but true, that irresponsible individuals can try and fob off pre-existing conditions as surgery related, or expect that one visit to a vet every now and again for an emergency makes a patient/doctor relationship. Every professional is taught to "practice defensively" and any good professional has loyal, guardian of the gate staff to protect the professional from exhaustion as well as protect them from potential difficulties down the road. My vet says that most post-op questions really can be handled over the phone and it isn't unusual to do a "heavy screen" on the first post-op call and to quiz the person about whether the printed instructions are being followed TO THE LETTER. Heck, it could even have been a different tech. Sadly, one "bad apple" doesn't only give a vet grief, but can bring down an entire practice with charges, counter charges, costs, bad p.r., etc.

I'd say, give your vet and the techies a chance. Seems as if in protecting their boss, the techs were a tad over zealous and the vet is doing the best s/he can to ensure your pet's health and your satisfaction with the matter. I have been very fortunate in that I have an excellent (but sometimes very grumpy) vet, who has a lovely family and a great staff, and we "pop by" for visits on and off so my boys don't think the only reason to go to the vet is to be poked or prodded.

Think of your vet as a great pediatrician -- a generalist in a "specialty" which is all about the special relationship with the patients. I remember my childhood pediatrician was grumpy, too, though his eyes would fill with tears about sick children or parents who didn't allow children to take the polio vaccine when it was voluntary. We'd ask lots of questions about the instruments and why he was doing what he was doing and he'd take lots of time to explain everything to us as kids, but we were also properly "prepped" by our teacher parents. Teachers are like that -- everything is a learning opportunity! I was the one in the family that was constantly falling out of trees and having other like crises -- I once got a mildly grumpy talk about risk-taking and causing my family grief and then, when I was in a month later for stitches, a right-o stern talking-to! I was able to take my daughter to him, and he was most pleased -- though I also got a lecture about having a baby too young and I better get my intelligent self back in University!

Take your vet photos of your dog, make sure your vet is a steady, regular force in your dog's or dogs life. Ask your vet's advice! It is amazing how my vet fusses over my boys, and since I make it a practice to read everything I can get my hands on, well, our conversations about health issues are at a different level than: here, take this! or, "don't worry, everything is fine as long as you take this!"

These days, with health care for four foots and two foots costing soooo much, I know that many people shop for a vet on price, and may "wander" from vet to vet. If you choose to find another vet, or stick with this one, remember that it is hard to get to know a patient, it requires time and energy, and it breaks a doc's heart to think that someone would leave their care, or interrupt a good relationship, because someone else is offering a "special" on flea meds or heartworm pills. I know how my doc bills, and the little "breaks" come, and over the years I have spent less than others, though on any one individual treatment, that is not the case, necessarily.
 
Reply
   
Quote
   
Top
   
Bottom
     



pinktat
Member

Posts: 9
Joined: Apr 2007

Thu May 31, 2007 3:51 AM
User is offline


I would like to thank everyone for the advice they gave. I am pleased to say after a worrying time Sasha is now well on the road to recovery. The vet is still bemused as to what the problem was, although he did agree there was a problem, so theres no way of knowing if it will return at a later date. Fingers crossed that it was something triggered by surgery and it will not reoccur. The swelling has begun to go down after being on several different medications, and as it has reduced so has her temprature. I took her out yesterday to the nature reserve for the first time since her op and her eyes lit up. She managed a good 10-15 mins off lead, running around and playing...it almost brought tears to my eyes, seeing her so happy again. It will take a while to build her up again as she's still getting out of breath a lot but all the signs are good. On the day she was operated on I also took 2 cats for the same, they to have had to return to the vets after becoming ill with sickness and the runs. The vet said it wasn't linked at all but I still think it odd that 3 pets I took in, were all done on the same day and all became ill afterwards. Thankfully they weren't as bad as the dog and after a bout of medication it cleared up but I am seriously considering finding a new vets as I no longer have full confindence in my current vet and I think you need to feel that your pet is in safe hands when it comes to their health.
 
Reply
   
Quote
   
Top
   
Bottom
     



colliemom
Senior Member

Posts: 1141
Joined: Mar 2006

Fri June 01, 2007 8:12 AM
User is offline

All it takes is one instrument improperly cleaned, or a ghardia breakout in the neighbourhood. When you go vet hunting, take one or another of the animals with you for a consultation and baseline check-up. Try out three or four that way. It can be expensive, but in finding someone you trust, and feel that a long-term relationship is possible, this is important. Take a good look at ALL the people in the place, techs, attendants, and groomer (if there) as well as the vet. The whole team will be handling your babies. Some vets are better with certain breeds or types of ailments. Find out what your vet likes to "work on".
 
Reply
   
Quote
   
Top
   
Bottom
     



ladysnowfall
Senior Member

Posts: 508
Joined: Apr 2007

Fri June 01, 2007 5:36 PM
User is offline

And make sure they really listen to you about any concerns you may have. YOU and only you really know when your pets are having an "off" day and that something is wrong!
 
Reply
   
Quote
   
Top
   
Bottom
     

View thread in raw text format
FORUMS > Health, Wellness and Nutrition < refresh >

Navigation: